March 8, 2012


This image, and others like it have been blowing up my facebook, twitter, and tumblr. After a few posts with sentiments like, “Watch this video and join the fight.” They were all very serious and bold statements. So I followed the link to a 24 minute long video that explained who Joseph Kony is (a Ugandan warlord who kidnaps children and forces them to kill) and proposed a call to action in 2012. 
The Ugandan and American authorities have been unsuccessful in locating Kony thus far. The person who made this video suggests a number of things to make more people aware of Kony’s injustices, get and keep our government involved, and make a change for the children in Africa. 
The way he’s suggests we make these things happen is incredibly thoughtful, and obviously effective. For now, he asks that everyone share the video and tweet links to famous, relevant individuals because they can use their popularity to spread the word to mass audiences. Celebrities that are being targeted include, Angelina Jolie, George Clooney, and Mark Zuckerberg. Once people watch the video they are encouraged to purchase the “Action Kit” which contains posters, posters, stickers, and bracelets. On the night of April 20, people in major cities across America will hang these posters aand stickers so that on April 21 they are everywhere. 
The poster design is similar to the picture above and the idea is to get people wondering what it’s all about. The statement about the campaign: “Kony 2012 is a film and campaign by Invisible Children that aims to make Joseph Kony famous, not to celebrate him, but to raise support for his arrest and set a precedent for international justice.”
This whole campaign seemed to have blossomed overnight and is taking over the internet and every form of social network. I think this is a perfect example of the power of the internet and how it can be used for a purpose, and not just tweeting and posting random things. It’s clear that this campaign was thought through simply because of how much it’s working. 

This image, and others like it have been blowing up my facebook, twitter, and tumblr. After a few posts with sentiments like, “Watch this video and join the fight.” They were all very serious and bold statements. So I followed the link to a 24 minute long video that explained who Joseph Kony is (a Ugandan warlord who kidnaps children and forces them to kill) and proposed a call to action in 2012. 

The Ugandan and American authorities have been unsuccessful in locating Kony thus far. The person who made this video suggests a number of things to make more people aware of Kony’s injustices, get and keep our government involved, and make a change for the children in Africa. 

The way he’s suggests we make these things happen is incredibly thoughtful, and obviously effective. For now, he asks that everyone share the video and tweet links to famous, relevant individuals because they can use their popularity to spread the word to mass audiences. Celebrities that are being targeted include, Angelina Jolie, George Clooney, and Mark Zuckerberg. Once people watch the video they are encouraged to purchase the “Action Kit” which contains posters, posters, stickers, and bracelets. On the night of April 20, people in major cities across America will hang these posters aand stickers so that on April 21 they are everywhere. 

The poster design is similar to the picture above and the idea is to get people wondering what it’s all about. The statement about the campaign: “Kony 2012 is a film and campaign by Invisible Children that aims to make Joseph Kony famous, not to celebrate him, but to raise support for his arrest and set a precedent for international justice.”

This whole campaign seemed to have blossomed overnight and is taking over the internet and every form of social network. I think this is a perfect example of the power of the internet and how it can be used for a purpose, and not just tweeting and posting random things. It’s clear that this campaign was thought through simply because of how much it’s working. 

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See Post tags #kony 2012 #viral marketing